Why study this course

Learn about the range of core psychological domains and methods, accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS)

Learn about and engage with on-site research projects, exploring contemporary issues such as mindfulness, psychopathy and the science of dreaming

Progressing into Teaching? FREE pre-teaching course and guaranteed interview for PGCE

This is a highly practical degree, teamed with the theory you will need to succeed. Gain up to 9 weeks of experience within work-based placements.

Course summary

If you don’t have, or don’t think you will attain, the normal tariff points for studying at BGU, this course will enable you to study for a degree without any UCAS points. The course is delivered over four years and includes a Foundation Year, which gives you a perfect introduction to what it means to be a university student and prepares you for effective undergraduate study. In your Foundation Year, you will study eight modules, all of which are designed to equip you with the necessary academic skills and knowledge to progress successfully in your chosen subject. You will also engage in a series of bespoke subject sessions delivered by experts, designed to introduce you to your chosen subject area.

You can find out more about our Foundation Year programme by clicking here.

Through studying a Psychology degree at BGU you’ll gain an in-depth understanding of the scientific nature of the subject and of its wider cultural and social impact. This course will develop your understanding of psychology and its theories of the mind, emotions and behaviour and become familiar with how these theories are applied in our lives, communities and societies.

Studying Education Studies at BGU will provide you with an excellent understanding of education in its widest sense, nationally and globally, and is a great course if you are interested in a career in teaching or are thinking about working in other education-related areas.

Key facts


Award

BA (Hons)

UCAS code

X8CF

Duration

4 years

Mode of study

Full-time

Start date

September

Awarding institution

Bishop Grosseteste University

Institution code

B38

Course details

About this course


Psychology

Do you ever wonder why is it we behave as we do? How do gangs, teams and friendship groups form? Do you wonder if smiling really does make you feel more positive? Do you often venture into the bigger questions about life and who we are?

Psychology has a science base, yet includes a balance of liberal arts, technological knowledge, statistics and computer-based skills. As well as classic psychological theories and research, on this undergraduate degree you’ll be debating social issues, studying specific mental processes, such as memory, language and attention, as well as broader issues and theories – both historical and contemporary. As well as applying psychological knowledge to a range of subjects, you will develop your skills in problem-solving, data analysis, predict and reasoning, with a focus on real-world application.

Here at BGU in Lincoln, we ensure you have close support and contact with your tutors and, with small group sizes, you’ll always get the support and feedback you need on your course. We also know how important it is to experience a real working environment so, through work placements and other projects, you’ll be equipped for whichever career path you may choose after your degree. With research-informed teaching and research-active staff, you’ll receive scientific training and gain an in-depth understanding of the nature of the subject, at the same time as applying your knowledge and theory to real-life.



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Education Studies

How do people learn? What gets in the way of learning? Where might people learn best – and how? Do we need schools? Is it possible to ‘school’ the world? Can education make a difference to human rights? Women's rights? Nationally? Globally? These are just some of the big questions that you will examine through studying Education Studies at BGU in Lincoln. We are proud of our highly contemporary, reactive and issues-based course that has been carefully designed to give you that ‘bigger’ picture of education in a global society. An Education Studies degree from BGU will equip you well for the future, no matter what your career destination, but if you are planning to go on to teach you will find that our modules will open your eyes to some different ways of thinking about education and its purpose and place in society.

Studying Education Studies with us will provide you with an excellent understanding of education in its widest sense, nationally and globally, and is a great choice if you are interested in a career in teaching or are thinking about working in other education-related areas. The undergraduate degree provides you with a deep and reflective knowledge and understanding of contemporary issues in education, directly related to everyday practice. You’ll debate education policy, find out more about the drivers of educational change in England today and critically consider different approaches to schools and schooling, both within the UK and globally.

A key feature of Education Studies is a focus on you as a developing practitioner. You will be encouraged to develop a strong personal ideology of education during the course and will be supported in the development of secure employability skills through our work-based placements. A number of core modules each year incorporate placements in schools or other education-related settings and carefully structured placement tasks will ensure that you gain valuable first-hand practical experience.

What you will study

As a student on this course, you may study some or all of the modules listed below.

In this module you will explore and consider what it means to be a successful learner at university. You’ll explore the principles of effective learning and engage with a range of tools and techniques to practise and develop strategies for your own learning. These include for example, understanding your needs as a learner, effective time management and organisational skills.

You will learn about a range of resources and practise locating and using these resources to support effective learning. These resources will include, for example, textbooks, websites, academic journals, and popular press. In addition to these key techniques, the module covers academic conventions including referencing, citation and the risks of plagiarism.

This module will allow you to learn to utilise sources in a considered and critical way. You will begin to engage effectively with literature and other sources in a meaningful manner that promotes deep learning and enables knowledge and understanding of a topic. You will also begin to differentiate qualitative and quantitative data and consider their appropriate interpretation and use.

Critical thinking is an integral part of university study. While studying this module you will define critical thinking, its importance and how it can help you in your learning. A range of critical thinking models will be utilised to demonstrate how this works in action, allowing you to recognise critical thinking and identify barriers and challenges.

The skilled use of digital technologies is an important element in university study and is used to support both the obtaining and demonstration of knowledge. This module will develop your digital capabilities and confidence, encouraging you to develop techniques for the purposeful use of a range of digital tools to support learning. These include specific tools such as the Virtual Learning Environment and appropriate and effective uses of wider applications such as social media, email and the internet.

This module explores, compares and evaluates a range of communication types, giving you opportunities to combine written and spoken communication in a range of contexts and for a range of audiences. From a theoretical, sociological perspective you will explore different communication media and styles of discourse, for example, discussion, debate, enquiry and reporting.

Reflection is a powerful learning tool that enables you to consider your existing knowledge and also to plan for your future learning and professional development. The module content includes the principles of reflective learning and collaborative planning with reference to structured models.

Academic writing is an essential element of successful university study, so this module explores a range of techniques to help develop your own academic writing style. It will enable you to draw together your learning throughout the Foundation Year and reflect on the feedback you have received. You will structure a clear and effective piece of academic writing on a subject-linked topic in which you will apply standard academic conventions.

This module will introduce you to core areas and methods integral to the discipline and study of psychology. It will provide a historical and contextual backdrop to psychology as a scientific discipline, as well as a focus on research methodologies. This module will introduce you to the wonderful world of numberland, where you will embark on a quantitative journey through research methods and statistical techniques. It will equip you with the tools necessary to investigate questions you may have about human psychology, and to do it in a robust and scientific manner. It will explore aspects of research design, underpinnings of statistical theory, as well as core statistical techniques such as t-tests and correlation. It will analyse data using statistical software and interpret related output appropriately. This module will also provide an introduction to qualitative research methods, where you will be introduced to a range of applied qualitative methods in psychology, the core philosophical underpinnings of such techniques, as well as its relation to quantitative methods.

The module will provide you with an understanding of developmental psychology across the lifespan, exploring physical development, cognitive development, social and emotional development throughout childhood and later into maturity. You will gain a deeper understanding of the theories, themes and concepts in developmental psychology and appreciate that development continues throughout the lifespan and is influenced by a range of factors including class, culture, gender, ethnicity and heredity. In addition, you will learn about the current issues and methods involved in lifespan research, together with specific empirical studies that address developmental research questions and contemporary and cross-cultural developments that have emerged in the field.

This module will immerse you in the origins of psychology, with respect to early understandings of what psychology is (Plato; Aristotle), as well as the development and establishment of Psychology as a discipline in its own right. You will be introduced to the history of science and the Scientific Revolution, as well as corresponding developments in metaphysics and epistemology as manifested in The Enlightenment, and how this contributed to the emergence and shaping of psychology as an experimental science from which behaviourism and the cognitive revolution later emerged. This context will enable you to understand debates within psychology that concern it’s standing as a science and the differences in psychological research methodologies that accompany those debates. Focus on the historicisation of psychology will prompt you to evaluate your perceptions of Psychology and how you, and society understand and identify with it in both professional and personal settings. Furthermore, “classic” studies in psychology will be explored in reference to recent research that demonstrates issues with their findings, especially in the context of the current replicability crisis in Psychology.

The interlinked yet distinct areas of the brain and the mind continue to be the subject of considerable study, aided by developments in research methods and technological tools. Increasingly knowledge about the brain and the mind is being embedded in education policy and practice. This Level 4 module explores the intersections of neuroscience, pedagogy, policy and psychology though various topics that relate to the brain, the mind and education. It introduces you to areas of the brain that have particular relevance for learning, for example executive functions and the role of working memory, key themes such as the roles of nature and nature in brain development and theories of intelligence such as IQ and Multiple Intelligences. Additionally, the module goes beyond the brain to explore broader theories of cognition connected to the mind, body and environment, for example embodied cognition. Throughout the module topics about the brain and the mind will be related to education so you will critically consider implications for teaching and learning and the applicability of theory and research to educational settings. As part of this module you will build your knowledge of education research that will act as a foundation for developing key research skills across the following years of the programme. You will engage with research on the brain and cognition to understand different research methodologies and tools. You will be supported to begin to think critically about research findings by examining the quantity and quality of the evidence that is presented. Additionally, you may identify where issues with the research findings or inaccurate interpretations of these findings have led to myths about the brain gaining currency in educational practice.

An understanding of how individuals learn and the factors that shape learning is fundamental to any study of education. This Level 4 module will introduces you to a range of key theoretical ideas and principles about learning from birth to adulthood. It explores theories that focus on adult learning, for example andragogy, as well as pedagogical ones that centre around child learners, for example behaviourism and constructivism. The module combines a study of these historical approaches with a consideration of contemporary theories such as heutagogy and factors like education policy that shape, or even determine, learning in the 21st Century. It will enable you to draw on your own experiences of learning and will encourage you to critically engage with theories to identify strengths, limitations and the applicability to educational environments. As part of this module you may work on developing key academic skills that will provide a foundation for academic work at all levels of the programme. Such work may include academic reading skills, for example identifying and reading different types of sources, and academic writing skills, such as structuring written assignments. You will undertake a placement that will enable you to apply theoretical perspectives from the module to understand and reflect on pupils’ learning within the education system. The placement also provides you with the opportunity to begin to develop key professional skills. Teaching and learning will proceed by way of interactives lectures, seminars and tutorials, supported by e-learning and VLE-based tasks. Tutor-led seminars will utilise collaborative group work in order to model and enable learning and assist you in developing the skills to study and learn independently. In this module you will develop subject expertise, professional skills and increase graduate attributes, most notably academic literacies and employability.

Personality and Individual Differences is a multifaceted module that covers the history, cornerstone theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches of personality research. The structure of human personality is examined using a trait-based approach, which is applied in a variety of sub-topics leading to a comprehensive understanding of how personality and individual differences influence thought and behaviour in different settings. The contributions of biological and environmental factors in the development of personality and individual differences, as well as associated controversies are also explored. You will consolidate your learning by utilising psychometric methods to design and run a quantitative study in an area of personality research of your choosing. Accordingly, this module helps to prepare you for your third-year dissertation module in providing experience of the research process, from design, gaining ethical approval, data collection and analysis to reporting and discussing findings.

This module will develop your knowledge and understanding of social psychology, one of the core areas of psychology introduced in Researching Psychology I. Social Psychology will engage you with the breadth and diversity of social psychology as a discipline from social constructionism and group processes through to social cognition, collective behaviour, and social interactions. The purpose is to help you gain a detailed understanding of how people think, feel and act in relation to others and the world around them. Key topics will engage you with the indexical nature of the discipline locating historical and contemporary research and theory within its broader socio-economic and cultural context.

This module will build and extend on core methods and statistical techniques acquired at level 4 in Researching Psychology I. You will develop knowledge and skills integral to advanced psychological research designs, including the use of quantitative and qualitative analysis techniques. Specifically, this module covers three research methods strands including experimental, psychometric, and qualitative methods. Statistical underpinnings and application of techniques relevant to experimental (e.g., One-way ANOVA, Factorial ANOVA) and psychometric-based research (e.g., Regression, Multiple Regression) are covered and directly extend methods learnt in Researching Psychology I. Additionally, you will develop applied methods skills by utilising specialist software such as SPSS for the analysis of quantitative data. A variety of qualitative approaches, methods and analyses will also be considered such as interviewing skills, diaries and photo elicitation, discourse analysis, polytextual thematic analysis and descriptive phenomenology.

This module will draw on and develop your understanding and experience of real- world contexts. Building on placement experiences in Level 4 the module explores the wider role(s) of a professional in a setting. It enables you to apply knowledge and skills in a real-life context offering you a valuable experience to draw on when you present yourself to employers or selectors upon graduation. The module will introduce you to key theoretical ideas and principles related to reflective practice and professionalism. It will provide a critical understanding of successful elements for career development including relevant practical guidance on tools to support this such as individual ‘professional context’ action plans, careers advice, CVs, letters of application and personal statements. The syllabus will include a block placement and the study of reflective practice and student-professionalism. You will be introduced to key educational theorists and philosophers concerned with reflective practice such as Dewey, Schὂn and Kolb and the significant contributions of each. You will reflect on your own approaches to reflective practice and further develop critical thinking. The strengths, limitations and general applicability of reflective practice for professionals will be considered carefully in the light of evidence presented and this will be related to your own work on placement. Workshops provide you with the opportunity to participate in academic practices, including developing academic reading and writing skills at level 5 which is embedded in the context of the taught component. This module is deliberately structured in an open-ended way to allow placement to develop in a manner most suited to your potential future career and to respond to opportunities presented by employers.

This module builds on and develops the basic methods and data interpretation skills developed during Level 4 modules. The module also prepares you for your Dissertation at Level 6 especially if you are intending to pursue a Dissertation (Capstone Project) in Education Studies or other Social Science (at Level 6). You will explore ways in which a range of quantitative and qualitative methods can be brought to the investigation of educational issues. You will apply selected quantitative and qualitative methods and will be introduced to the benefits and difficulties of education research. You will develop your understanding of the range of research methodologies and research methods (data collection tools) that can be used in education research, and further develop your skills of statistical analysis and data interpretation.

An understanding of the principles and practice of inclusive education is crucial to those who intend to work in an educational context. This module will introduce you to the philosophical social justice debate and theories and ideologies of inclusive practice, and will examine interpretations of diversity and inclusion in different contexts. Although matters relating to inclusion are embedded in all modules, this offers you the opportunity to study the topic in depth and to critically analyse and apply a range of theories in the context of your work with young people in a range of educational contexts. It will build on the values, beliefs and philosophies explored in Level 4 modules and extend your appreciation of issues of human rights, equality and equity.

The Dissertation requires you to work independently in producing a substantial piece of research that demonstrates mastery of academic knowledge and research skills commensurate with Level 6. You will draw on your existing repertoire of experience garnered over the course of the degree in the development of a report akin to a journal style article, representative of the discipline. You will initiate your research protocol as defined in the first semester module, Research Project Design, and subsequently manage participant recruitment, data collection, and data analysis in accordance with the BPS Code of Ethics and Conduct. The Dissertation should aspire to produce published articles in the discipline (corresponding to the subject topic). The design of the study should successfully address the research question such that data collection and data analysis provide meaningful insight into the identified gap in the literature. You are expected to thoroughly scrutinise the findings in relation to relevant theoretical and methodological issues and in doing so, produce a meaningful contribution to the literature.

This module focuses upon the BPS Core domain Biopsychology, covering aspects of the biological basis of behaviours, emotions and mental health. The module aims to provide an overview of how the sub-disciplines within biopsychology (e.g., neuropsychology, cognitive neuroscience) approach psychological research questions. The module will support development of an in-depth understanding of neural conductance and major brain structures/systems to particular neurotransmitter systems as explanations of how the brain affects behaviour. The module aims to develop your understanding of the anatomical and physiological processes that underpin psychological experience whilst exploring the methodologies used to examine contemporary issues in biopsychology. To achieve these aims, the module will enable you to critically examine how contemporary biopsychological models are developed and evaluate these as explanations for behaviour using key examples (e.g., emotions, memory and learning, drugs and addiction and mental health disorders). This module promotes the application of multiple perspectives (including knowledge gained of other domains in previous years) to critique biopsychological theory and to critically appraise information, using evidenced based reasoning.

This module develops knowledge and understanding of the BPS core domain of Cognitive Psychology which you will have been introduced to at level 4 in Researching Psychology I. Throughout this module, there will be discussion and critical evaluation of a range of different cognitive psychological constructs (e.g., processing resources, attention, memory, language) as a toolkit for theorising mental functioning. You will critically engage with core constructs in cognitive psychology, associated methodologies and key perspectives (for example cognitive neuropsychology, neuroscience, fundamentals of the experimental method). Throughout the module, the use of computerised experimental paradigms will be explored, which underpin theories. For example, you will have the opportunity to engage with classical experimental paradigms or paradigms with a cognitive basis such learning, memory and problem-solving computerised tasks, within workshop sessions. The module aims to showcase the breadth of approaches to understand cognitive processes whilst critically engaging you with relevant associated methodologies. You will have opportunities to engage in a variety of cognitive experiments to facilitate your understanding of key topics and experimental approaches.

The module provides an opportunity for you to build upon and apply the key intellectual, transferable and practical skills gained at Levels 4 and 5 of the programme in order to design an appropriate research project for your Psychology dissertation. Throughout the module a series of lectures, seminars and workshops will further develop your research design skills in experimental, quasi-experimental, surveys and/or qualitative research methods. In addition, you will develop a critical understanding of ethical challenges associated with carrying out psychological research leading to the development of a research project that adheres to the British Psychological Society’s Code of Ethics and Conduct (2018) and BGU's Research Ethics Committee standards.

This module will build on (EDU50322) Vision to Reality and introduce you to a further range of contexts and settings for learning, examining these from the perspective of educators and learners, policy and practice. Throughout the module you will be encouraged to consider and appreciate the scope and limitations of education within a variety of teaching and learning environments and organisations. You will be introduced to a wider and more complex range of research and theory related to the benefits and limitations of teaching and learning in informal and alternative learning environments alongside the unique personal embodiment / impact of these on the overall experience of learners and educators. You will consider how pedagogical approaches are utilised in these contexts and how such contexts are positioned in contemporary educational policy. You will develop and apply skills of critical analysis in module sessions and independent learning. First hand experiences of different learning contexts through study visits and work with visiting experts will be threaded through the module as a basis for comparison, analysis, evaluation and reflection.

An awareness of global perspectives on education strengthens Education Studies students’ understanding of educational issues, ideas, and solutions by broadening the scope of study beyond the UK. This module explores the impact of globalisation on education policy and practice in different international settings in varied international, social, economic, and political contexts. The module requires you to take a global perspective on issues and trends such as citizenship, human rights, access to education, and education for sustainable development and relate these to social theories of education and development goals. You will be encouraged to reflect on the global, multicultural nature of our society and your own cultural fluency, and research contrasting perspectives on effective responses to the diversity of international school pupils’ backgrounds, experiences, and needs. You will be required to engage critically with module topics and develop as an independent learner and critical thinker to investigate your chosen area of research.

Excellence and innovation in curricula are a central tenet of any world class education system. This highly responsive module provides you with a theoretical and critical understanding of key considerations in the development and implementation of curriculum policy, content and practice in educational settings. The module considers future developments in the current curriculum and possible alternative future directions. It provides you with an opportunity to study this at first hand in placement settings. A range of theoretical approaches to the curriculum will be critically examined. The syllabus may include topics such as differing views of the nature and organisation of knowledge, and examination of various curriculum frameworks, including aims, content and contemporary views of pedagogy. These will vary over time in order to ensure that the module is responsive to new developments and future directions in education for instance decolonising of the curriculum and environmental education. Innovative practice from inspirational educational settings may be showcased in order to provide models of excellence. Placement will allow you to gain real-world experiences of current curriculum arrangements.

Entry requirements

Application for this course is via UCAS, although there is no formal requirement for UCAS points to access the course (normally GCSE English or equivalent is desirable). As part of your application you will have the opportunity to speak with a member of BGU Admissions staff to resolve any questions or queries you may have

You will also need GCSEs in English Language and Mathematics at grade 4 (previously C) or above (or equivalent).

For International Entry GCSE requirements please contact our Enquiries Team on enquiries@bishopg.ac.uk

If you are asked to undertake a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check as part of the conditions of your offer, this must be completed prior to the start of your course at a cost of £57.20.

Further information

Click here for important information about this course including additional costs, resources and key policies.

The Foundation Year syllabus does not include any specific element of upskilling in English language and you are not entitled to apply for Accredited Prior Learning, AP(C)L into a Foundation Year.

Unfortunately, we are unable to accept applications from international students for Foundation year programmes linked to Psychology courses.

How you will be taught

There is no one-size-fits-all method of teaching at BGU – we shape our methods to suit each subject and each group, combining the best aspects of traditional university teaching with innovative techniques to promote student participation and interactivity.

You will be taught in a variety of ways, from lectures, tutorials and seminars, to practical workshops, coursework and work-based placements. Small group seminars and workshops will provide you with an opportunity to review issues raised in lectures, and you will be expected to carry out independent study.

Placements are a key part of degree study within many courses at BGU. They provide an enriching learning experience for you to apply the skills and knowledge you will gain from your course and, in doing so, give valuable real-world experience to boost your career.

Assessment

During the Foundation Year, you will have opportunities to experience a range of formative and summative assessments. These include short-form writing, annotated bibliographies, presentations, digital technologies, reflective journals, and academic essays. All modules involve early, small, and frequent informal and formal assessments so as to be supportive and build confidence, while ensuring development of the core academic skills required for successful study throughout your degree. Assessment strategies are balanced, diverse, and inclusive, ensuring that you will experience a range of assessments to support comprehensive preparation for undergraduate study. You will also have the opportunity for self-evaluation and personal reflection on your own learning progress and development of skills.

Psychology

Assessments in Psychology take place at the end of each module in order for you to demonstrate your understanding of the objectives covered. A wide range of assessment methods is used to support your learning, including portfolios, presentations, displays and examinations and laboratory projects. The Psychology course includes assessments that are designed to develop and refine specific skills that you may well need to draw on as a psychologist, whether that is as specific as demonstrating your practical counselling skills in the Introduction to Psychological Therapies module, or openly argumentative as in the group debate in the Personality and Individual Differences module! Assessments are also designed to enhance your critical thinking and analysis skills – something that psychologists are well known for.

Education Studies

In Education Studies, assessment is carried out through coursework of different types, including essays, reports, oral presentations, multimedia presentations, reflective logs and portfolios. There are no examinations. You can expect to give one or two oral presentations or poster presentations as one of a small group of students throughout the course. You will gradually build up skills of multimedia presentation and third-year students currently share a short, assessed multimedia film to their peers. You will build up your writing skills steadily throughout the course and in the first year, you will complete a portfolio of shorter written pieces and two longer essays, receiving formative feedback from your tutors to help you build up your academic capabilities.

Careers & Further study

Psychology

In Psychology we allow you to develop the knowledge and skills which will make you attractive to an employer. Psychology graduates go on to work in a range of sectors including teaching, education or training, local government, health and social work and in areas of industry including human resources management. By the end of this course, you will be ready to apply your knowledge of psychology to the world in which you live, with the necessary workplace skills for a variety of future careers. Future careers for Psychology graduates may include work within Clinical settings, Counselling, Mental Health services, Education and Research.

Education Studies

Education Studies graduates enjoy very high levels of employability – the course facilitates your personal and professional employability skills through regular work based placements – and our students are in high demand. Currently, around 70% of our students complete a teacher training course and will go on to be highly successful Primary or Secondary teachers. An Education Studies degree from BGU means your career opportunities are diverse. In addition to careers in education, Education Studies graduates are well placed to work in other education related, health, social care, public information or communication sectors. The course provides good training for a role within business, service industries, personnel, museums, galleries or charities. The diverse nature of this course will also enable you to go onto further study such as postgraduate study on a master's degree.

What Our Students Say

Discover what life is like at Bishop Grosseteste University from our students.

Support

Studying at BGU is a student-centred experience. Staff and students work together in a friendly and supportive atmosphere as part of an intimate campus community. You will know every member of staff personally and feel confident approaching them for help and advice, and staff members will recognise you, not just by sight, but as an individual with unique talents and interests.

We will be there to support you, personally and academically, from induction to graduation.

Fees & Finance

A lot of student finance information is available from numerous sources, but it is sometimes confusing and contradictory. That’s why at BGU we try to give you all the information and support we can to help to throughout the process. Our Student Advice team are experts in helping you sort out the funding arrangements for your studies, offering a range of services to guide you through all aspects of student finance step by step.

Click here to find information about fees, loans and support which will help to make the whole process a little easier to understand.

Undergraduate course applicants must apply via UCAS using the relevant UCAS code. For 2023 entry, the application fee is £27, and you can make a maximum of 6 choices. For 2024 entry the application fee is £27.50.
For all applicants, there are full instructions at UCAS to make it as easy as possible for you to fill in your online application, plus help text where appropriate.