Why study this course

This is a highly practical degree, teamed with the theory you will need to succeed. Gain up to 9 weeks of experience within work-based placements.

You'll gain invaluable classroom practice and will have flexible opportunities to experience other educational settings.

Progressing into Teaching? FREE pre-teaching course and guaranteed interview for PGCE

Choose from multiple degree combinations, allowing you to keep your career pathway open, whilst also being excellent preparation for PGCE courses.

Course summary

If you don’t have, or don’t think you will attain, the normal tariff points for studying at BGU, this course will enable you to study for a degree without any UCAS points. The course is delivered over four years and includes a Foundation Year, which gives you a perfect introduction to what it means to be a university student and prepares you for effective undergraduate study. In your Foundation Year, you will study eight modules, all of which are designed to equip you with the necessary academic skills and knowledge to progress successfully in your chosen subject. You will also engage in a series of bespoke subject sessions delivered by experts, designed to introduce you to your chosen subject area.

Find out more about our Foundation Year programme.

Studying Education Studies at BGU will provide you with an excellent understanding of education in its widest sense, nationally and globally, and is a great course if you are interested in a career in teaching or are thinking about working in other education-related areas.

Key facts

Award

BA (Hons)

UCAS code

X31F

Duration

4 years

Mode of study

Full-time

Start date

September

Awarding institution

Bishop Grosseteste University

Institution code

B38

Apply for this course

When you're ready to apply, the route you take will depend on your personal circumstances and preferred method of study. Click the relevant button below to start your application journey.

About this course

How do people learn? What gets in the way of learning? Where might people learn best – and how? Do we need schools? Is it possible to ‘school’ the world? Can education make a difference to human rights? Women's rights? Nationally? Globally? These are just some of the big questions that you will examine through studying Education Studies at BGU in Lincoln. We are proud of our highly contemporary, reactive and issues-based course that has been carefully designed to give you that ‘bigger’ picture of education in a global society. An Education Studies degree from BGU will equip you well for the future, no matter what your career destination, but if you are planning to go on to teach you will find that our modules will open your eyes to some different ways of thinking about education and its purpose and place in society.

Studying Education Studies with us will provide you with an excellent understanding of education in its widest sense, nationally and globally, and is a great choice if you are interested in a career in teaching or are thinking about working in other education-related areas. The undergraduate degree provides you with a deep and reflective knowledge and understanding of contemporary issues in education, directly related to everyday practice. You’ll debate education policy, find out more about the drivers of educational change in England today and critically consider different approaches to schools and schooling, both within the UK and globally.

A key feature of Education Studies is a focus on you as a developing practitioner. You will be encouraged to develop a strong personal ideology of education during the course and will be supported in the development of secure employability skills through our work-based placements. A number of core modules each year incorporate placements in schools or other education-related settings and carefully structured placement tasks will ensure that you gain valuable first-hand practical experience.

What you will study

As a student on this course, you may study some or all of the modules listed below.

In this module you will explore and consider what it means to be a successful learner at university. You’ll explore the principles of effective learning and engage with a range of tools and techniques to practise and develop strategies for your own learning. These include for example, understanding your needs as a learner, effective time management and organisational skills.

You will learn about a range of resources and practise locating and using these resources to support effective learning. These resources will include, for example, textbooks, websites, academic journals, and popular press. In addition to these key techniques, the module covers academic conventions including referencing, citation and the risks of plagiarism.

This module will allow you to learn to utilise sources in a considered and critical way. You will begin to engage effectively with literature and other sources in a meaningful manner that promotes deep learning and enables knowledge and understanding of a topic. You will also begin to differentiate qualitative and quantitative data and consider their appropriate interpretation and use.

Critical thinking is an integral part of university study. While studying this module you will define critical thinking, its importance and how it can help you in your learning. A range of critical thinking models will be utilised to demonstrate how this works in action, allowing you to recognise critical thinking and identify barriers and challenges.

The skilled use of digital technologies is an important element in university study and is used to support both the obtaining and demonstration of knowledge. This module will develop your digital capabilities and confidence, encouraging you to develop techniques for the purposeful use of a range of digital tools to support learning. These include specific tools such as the Virtual Learning Environment and appropriate and effective uses of wider applications such as social media, email and the internet.

This module explores, compares and evaluates a range of communication types, giving you opportunities to combine written and spoken communication in a range of contexts and for a range of audiences. From a theoretical, sociological perspective you will explore different communication media and styles of discourse, for example, discussion, debate, enquiry and reporting.

Reflection is a powerful learning tool that enables you to consider your existing knowledge and also to plan for your future learning and professional development. The module content includes the principles of reflective learning and collaborative planning with reference to structured models.

Academic writing is an essential element of successful university study, so this module explores a range of techniques to help develop your own academic writing style. It will enable you to draw together your learning throughout the Foundation Year and reflect on the feedback you have received. You will structure a clear and effective piece of academic writing on a subject-linked topic in which you will apply standard academic conventions.

This module will develop your knowledge and understanding of children’s personal, social, psychological and educational development. You will explore links between the child’s social and cultural context and their learning, development and wellbeing. The syllabus will use contemporary research to understand how concepts such as attachment, resilience, mental health, trauma, and emotional wellbeing can impact on the child and their development. It may also consider broader socioeconomic issues and their influence on child development, learning and wellbeing. This module will prepare you to engage with the curriculum pertaining to pupils’ holistic development during future placements as well as further study at Levels 5 and 6.

The interlinked yet distinct areas of the brain and the mind continue to be the subject of considerable study, aided by developments in research methods and technological tools. Increasingly knowledge about the brain and the mind is being embedded in education policy and practice. This Level 4 module explores the intersections of neuroscience, pedagogy, policy and psychology though various topics that relate to the brain, the mind and education. It introduces you to areas of the brain that have particular relevance for learning, for example executive functions and the role of working memory, key themes such as the roles of nature and nature in brain development and theories of intelligence such as IQ and Multiple Intelligences. Additionally, the module goes beyond the brain to explore broader theories of cognition connected to the mind, body and environment, for example embodied cognition. Throughout the module topics about the brain and the mind will be related to education so you will critically consider implications for teaching and learning and the applicability of theory and research to educational settings. As part of this module you will build your knowledge of education research that will act as a foundation for developing key research skills across the following years of the programme. You will engage with research on the brain and cognition to understand different research methodologies and tools. You will be supported to begin to think critically about research findings by examining the quantity and quality of the evidence that is presented. Additionally, you may identify where issues with the research findings or inaccurate interpretations of these findings have led to myths about the brain gaining currency in educational practice.

Building on the fundamental concepts of learning introduced previously in Level 4, this module focuses on the sociology of education and learning, and, primarily, how academic achievement and educational inequality is shaped by society and educational structures. The module provides teaching and classroom-based experiences through which the impact of a variety of sociological factors, such as socio-economic group, gender, ethnicity and human rights can be better understood. Relevant theories and approaches to explaining differences in attainment will be studied, together with an exploration of factors that might contribute to narrowing gaps in educational outcomes. As part of this module you may be expected to investigate and analyse a range of published sources of data on educational attainment and interventions and so learn to interpret and explain data presented in different ways. You will also undertake a placement that will enable you to apply knowledge gained in the module and further develop your transferable skills of communication and organisation, as well as gain further experiences of supporting learning.

An understanding of how individuals learn and the factors that shape learning is fundamental to any study of education. This Level 4 module will introduces you to a range of key theoretical ideas and principles about learning from birth to adulthood. It explores theories that focus on adult learning, for example andragogy, as well as pedagogical ones that centre around child learners, for example behaviourism and constructivism. The module combines a study of these historical approaches with a consideration of contemporary theories such as heutagogy and factors like education policy that shape, or even determine, learning in the 21st Century. It will enable you to draw on your own experiences of learning and will encourage you to critically engage with theories to identify strengths, limitations and the applicability to educational environments. As part of this module you may work on developing key academic skills that will provide a foundation for academic work at all levels of the programme. Such work may include academic reading skills, for example identifying and reading different types of sources, and academic writing skills, such as structuring written assignments. You will undertake a placement that will enable you to apply theoretical perspectives from the module to understand and reflect on pupils’ learning within the education system. The placement also provides you with the opportunity to begin to develop key professional skills. Teaching and learning will proceed by way of interactives lectures, seminars and tutorials, supported by e-learning and VLE-based tasks. Tutor-led seminars will utilise collaborative group work in order to model and enable learning and assist you in developing the skills to study and learn independently. In this module you will develop subject expertise, professional skills and increase graduate attributes, most notably academic literacies and employability.

This module will draw on and develop your understanding and experience of real- world contexts. Building on placement experiences in Level 4 the module explores the wider role(s) of a professional in a setting. It enables you to apply knowledge and skills in a real-life context offering you a valuable experience to draw on when you present yourself to employers or selectors upon graduation. The module will introduce you to key theoretical ideas and principles related to reflective practice and professionalism. It will provide a critical understanding of successful elements for career development including relevant practical guidance on tools to support this such as individual ‘professional context’ action plans, careers advice, CVs, letters of application and personal statements. The syllabus will include a block placement and the study of reflective practice and student-professionalism. You will be introduced to key educational theorists and philosophers concerned with reflective practice such as Dewey, Schὂn and Kolb and the significant contributions of each. You will reflect on your own approaches to reflective practice and further develop critical thinking. The strengths, limitations and general applicability of reflective practice for professionals will be considered carefully in the light of evidence presented and this will be related to your own work on placement. Workshops provide you with the opportunity to participate in academic practices, including developing academic reading and writing skills at level 5 which is embedded in the context of the taught component. This module is deliberately structured in an open-ended way to allow placement to develop in a manner most suited to your potential future career and to respond to opportunities presented by employers.

The use of digital technologies (increasingly including mobile technologies) in educational settings has expanded rapidly in recent years. Equally, the use of digital technologies (including mobile technologies) is a key dimension of competencies expected of graduates from all degree courses. As captured in BGU's Graduate Attributes (for instance Digital Fluency) graduates will increasingly require high levels of specific and generic skills which can evolve and develop throughout their academic and working lives and will require a critical understanding of the ideas and issues. This module provides that critical foundation by equipping you to know about, understand, use and apply digital literacies appropriately to the context of education and to develop a deep understanding of the strengths and limitations inherent in the use of technology (including mobile technology) in teaching and learning and approaches to assessment.

This module builds on and develops the basic methods and data interpretation skills developed during Level 4 modules. The module also prepares you for your Dissertation at Level 6 especially if you are intending to pursue a Dissertation (Capstone Project) in Education Studies or other Social Science (at Level 6). You will explore ways in which a range of quantitative and qualitative methods can be brought to the investigation of educational issues. You will apply selected quantitative and qualitative methods and will be introduced to the benefits and difficulties of education research. You will develop your understanding of the range of research methodologies and research methods (data collection tools) that can be used in education research, and further develop your skills of statistical analysis and data interpretation.

How did schools come to assume their present form and function? Who were the architects of ideas about education? An understanding of ways in which different ideas about education have variously shaped policy and practice, both in the UK and worldwide will enable you to develop knowledge and understanding of the ‘bigger’ picture of education; beyond that of your immediate and most recent experience. This highly responsive and contemporary module builds on concepts from Level 4 and examines a range of different ideas about the purpose and practice of education, including those of the most recent Government, relating these to some common educational ideologies. It considers a variety of ways in which the purpose and outcomes of education may be interpreted, and the diversity of settings in which it may take place.

Successful teaching involves educators being deliberate, thoughtful and purposeful in their decisions and actions. Choices and decisions about how to teach are constantly under scrutiny and are increasingly driven by national and international data. This module will build on the understanding of learners and learning developed at level 4, underpin concepts of innovative teaching and learning approaches introduced at level 5 (in semester 2); and will critically examine a range of views of effective pedagogical practice drawn from contemporary research. The syllabus will respond as necessary to contemporary developments as they arise drawing on international, national and comparative research. It may include social pedagogical approaches such as dialogic teaching, pupil talk, group work and other interactive teaching and learning approaches.

An understanding of the principles and practice of inclusive education is crucial to those who intend to work in an educational context. This module will introduce you to the philosophical social justice debate and theories and ideologies of inclusive practice, and will examine interpretations of diversity and inclusion in different contexts. Although matters relating to inclusion are embedded in all modules, this offers you the opportunity to study the topic in depth and to critically analyse and apply a range of theories in the context of your work with young people in a range of educational contexts. It will build on the values, beliefs and philosophies explored in Level 4 modules and extend your appreciation of issues of human rights, equality and equity.

This module will build on (EDU50322) Vision to Reality and introduce you to a further range of contexts and settings for learning, examining these from the perspective of educators and learners, policy and practice. Throughout the module you will be encouraged to consider and appreciate the scope and limitations of education within a variety of teaching and learning environments and organisations. You will be introduced to a wider and more complex range of research and theory related to the benefits and limitations of teaching and learning in informal and alternative learning environments alongside the unique personal embodiment / impact of these on the overall experience of learners and educators. You will consider how pedagogical approaches are utilised in these contexts and how such contexts are positioned in contemporary educational policy. You will develop and apply skills of critical analysis in module sessions and independent learning. First hand experiences of different learning contexts through study visits and work with visiting experts will be threaded through the module as a basis for comparison, analysis, evaluation and reflection.

Language and Literacy are the foundation for learning at any age and an ongoing focus for research and policy in education. This Level 6 module builds on your previous experiences in educational settings and your knowledge of policy, pedagogy and practice to study language and literacy learning from the early years through the primary school phase. The module focuses on core areas of literacy - reading, writing and speaking and listening. It studies historical developments in the teaching of these areas, as well as contemporary approaches shaped by education policy and 21st Century practices, for example digital literacy and critical literacy. It also explores the many factors that influence children’s literacy, for example home experiences, motivation and exposure to children’s literature, and considers how teaching can inspire all children to develop a lifelong love of literacy. You will critically engage with a range of competing arguments about effective teaching and learning in the core areas of literacy. You will employ Level 6 skills of analysis to synthesise and critique these different perspectives drawn from policy, research and theory. You will have the opportunity to evaluate resources for the teaching of reading, writing and speaking and listening and to create ones that are informed by your own understanding of literacy education.

This module will provide you with skills and knowledge needed to design, conduct and report a substantial dissertation on a subject of interest to you and of relevance in the current context of education. You will gain an understanding of different methodological approaches and perspectives on educational research and be encouraged to articulate your own epistemologies and ontologies. Taught sessions will help to inform and scaffold the your planning process and provide a range of methods for sourcing, collecting, collating and analysing both primary (collected on placement) and/or secondary data in the construction of the written work. The module will ensure that your understanding of research ethics and integrity is embedded at all stages of your dissertation including gaining ethical clearance for primary research. Consideration is given to the potential positive ‘legacy’ of your research in practice. You will build on the research skills imparted earlier in your studies, at all levels, applying them in a more independent manner. The module will deepen and refine your knowledge of your specialist area and offer insights into the construction of longer pieces of analytical written work, and the way in which arguments are mediated in them. Opportunities to share and refine ideas at all stages will be supported by group work and supervisory tutorials. Links with university services offering additional expertise relevant to supporting your research skills and writing will be integrated and signposted in the module.

An awareness of global perspectives on education strengthens Education Studies students’ understanding of educational issues, ideas, and solutions by broadening the scope of study beyond the UK. This module explores the impact of globalisation on education policy and practice in different international settings in varied international, social, economic, and political contexts. The module requires you to take a global perspective on issues and trends such as citizenship, human rights, access to education, and education for sustainable development and relate these to social theories of education and development goals. You will be encouraged to reflect on the global, multicultural nature of our society and your own cultural fluency, and research contrasting perspectives on effective responses to the diversity of international school pupils’ backgrounds, experiences, and needs. You will be required to engage critically with module topics and develop as an independent learner and critical thinker to investigate your chosen area of research.

Excellence and innovation in curricula are a central tenet of any world class education system. This highly responsive module provides you with a theoretical and critical understanding of key considerations in the development and implementation of curriculum policy, content and practice in educational settings. The module considers future developments in the current curriculum and possible alternative future directions. It provides you with an opportunity to study this at first hand in placement settings. A range of theoretical approaches to the curriculum will be critically examined. The syllabus may include topics such as differing views of the nature and organisation of knowledge, and examination of various curriculum frameworks, including aims, content and contemporary views of pedagogy. These will vary over time in order to ensure that the module is responsive to new developments and future directions in education for instance decolonising of the curriculum and environmental education. Innovative practice from inspirational educational settings may be showcased in order to provide models of excellence. Placement will allow you to gain real-world experiences of current curriculum arrangements.

Entry requirements

Application for this course is via UCAS, although there is no formal requirement for UCAS points to access the course (normally GCSE English or equivalent is desirable). As part of your application you will have the opportunity to speak with a member of BGU Admissions staff to resolve any questions or queries you may have.

Different degree subjects may have specific entry requirements to allow you to progress from the Foundation Year. Whilst not a condition of entry onto the Foundation Year, you will need to have met these by the time you complete the first year of this four year course.

If you are asked to undertake a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check as part of the conditions of your offer, this must be completed prior to the start of your course at a cost of £57.20.

Further information

Click here for important information about this course including additional costs, resources and key policies.

The Foundation Year syllabus does not include any specific element of upskilling in English language and you are not entitled to apply for Accredited Prior Learning, AP(C)L into a Foundation Year.

How you will be taught

There is no one-size-fits-all method of teaching at BGU – we shape our methods to suit each subject and each group, combining the best aspects of traditional university teaching with innovative techniques to promote student participation and interactivity.

You will be taught in a variety of ways, from lectures, tutorials and seminars, to practical workshops, coursework and work-based placements. Small group seminars and workshops will provide you with an opportunity to review issues raised in lectures, and you will be expected to carry out independent study.

Placements are a key part of degree study within many courses at BGU. They provide an enriching learning experience for you to apply the skills and knowledge you will gain from your course and, in doing so, give valuable real-world experience to boost your career.

Assessment

During the Foundation Year, you will have opportunities to experience a range of formative and summative assessments. These include short-form writing, annotated bibliographies, presentations, digital technologies, reflective journals, and academic essays. All modules involve early, small, and frequent informal and formal assessments so as to be supportive and build confidence, while ensuring development of the core academic skills required for successful study throughout your degree. Assessment strategies are balanced, diverse, and inclusive, ensuring that you will experience a range of assessments to support comprehensive preparation for undergraduate study. You will also have the opportunity for self-evaluation and personal reflection on your own learning progress and development of skills.

In Education Studies, assessment is carried out through coursework of different types, including essays, reports, oral presentations, multimedia presentations, reflective logs and portfolios. There are no examinations. You can expect to give one or two oral presentations or poster presentations as one of a small group of students throughout the course. You will gradually build up skills of multimedia presentation and third-year students currently share a short, assessed multimedia film to their peers. You will build up your writing skills steadily throughout the course and in the first year, you will complete a portfolio of shorter written pieces and two longer essays, receiving formative feedback from your tutors to help you build up your academic capabilities.

Careers & Further study

Education Studies graduates enjoy very high levels of employability – the course facilitates your personal and professional employability skills through regular work based placements – and our students are in high demand. Currently, around 70% of our students complete a teacher training course and will go on to be highly successful Primary or Secondary teachers. An Education Studies degree from BGU means your career opportunities are diverse. In addition to careers in education, Education Studies graduates are well placed to work in other education related, health, social care, public information or communication sectors. The course provides good training for a role within business, service industries, personnel, museums, galleries or charities. The diverse nature of this course will also enable you to go onto further study such as postgraduate study on a master's degree.

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Support

Studying at BGU is a student-centred experience. Staff and students work together in a friendly and supportive atmosphere as part of an intimate campus community. You will know every member of staff personally and feel confident approaching them for help and advice, and staff members will recognise you, not just by sight, but as an individual with unique talents and interests.

We will be there to support you, personally and academically, from induction to graduation.

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Fees & Funding

A lot of student finance information is available from numerous sources, but it is sometimes confusing and contradictory. That’s why at BGU we try to give you all the information and support we can to help to throughout the process. Our Student Advice team are experts in helping you sort out the funding arrangements for your studies, offering a range of services to guide you through all aspects of student finance step by step.

Click here to find information about fees, loans and support which will help to make the whole process a little easier to understand.

Undergraduate course applicants must apply via UCAS using the relevant UCAS code. For 2024 entry, the application fee is £27, and you can make a maximum of 6 choices.

For the 2025 cycle, UCAS is removing the undergraduate application fee for any student who is/or has received free school meals (FSM) during the last six years, up until the end of their final year at school or college. More information on the UCAS fee waiver can be found here.

Year of Study

UK ‘Home’ Students

International Students

Full-time Tuition Fee

Part-time Tuition Fee per 20 credit module

Part-time Tuition Fee per 30 credit module

Full-time Tuition Fee

2025/26

£9,250
n/a
£2,313
£13,600
2024/25

£9,250
n/a
£2,313
£12,945

For all applicants, there are full instructions at UCAS to make it as easy as possible for you to fill in your online application, plus help text where appropriate. Full details of all tuition fees can be found here.